Boat Club Road Animal Hospital
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Phone: 817-236-2000

9635 Boat Club Road
Fort Worth, Texas 76179

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HomeServices • Vaccines

Vaccines

Vaccines have proven important in preventing serious disease in dogs and cats.  Other than for rabies, which is state mandated, vaccination protocols vary based on your pet’s risk for exposure.  In addition, for some vaccines, the duration of protection may be far longer than previously recognized.  Our current vaccine recommendations are based on up-to-date research, the incidence of disease in our area, and the risk of exposure of your pet to the infectious agents. 

Core vaccines are vaccines which are recognized as significant for all dogs or cats in the population.  This is usually due to the severity and prevalence of disease or because it can be transmitted to people.  Non-core vaccines are given to pets based on their exposure risk.  Some of these diseases are just as important for your pet to be vaccinated against and you should discuss them with your veterinarian.  Depending on your pet’s medical history and lifestyle we can evaluate which vaccines are most appropriate for your pet. 

Canine:  Core Vaccines

Distemper: Canine Distemper Virus (CDV) can cause lethargy, fever, and many symptoms related to the respiratory, gastrointestinal, and nervous systems; any body tissue may be affected. CDV is often fatal. Infection occurs by exposure of the air passages to airborne CDV particles, making this virus highly contagious. 

Adenovirus (Hepatitis): Canine Adenovirus usually infects the liver, causing symptoms related to that organ.  It can be fatal in severe cases. Infection occurs by exposure to infected urine, feces, and body secretions.

Parainfluenza: Parainfluenza is an upper respiratory virus that causes coughing, sneezing, snorting, or gagging or vomiting.

Parvovirus: Canine Parvovirus (CPV) can cause diarrhea, vomiting and weight loss; dehydration is also a serious concern. CPV can be rapidly fatal. Infection occurs by oral exposure to infected feces, and CPV can live in the environment for extended periods.

Rabies: Rabies virus causes fatal disease in mammals (both wild and domestic) including dogs, cats and humans. The virus enters through a bite wound from a rabid animal, or via exposure of mucous membranes (eyes, nose, mouth) to infected blood or body secretions including saliva. The virus then spreads to the nervous system (causing symptoms like anxiety, aggression, disorientation, incoordination, paralysis, seizures, hyper-salivation, difficulty swallowing) and the salivary glands (enabling transmission to bite victims). There is no cure and rabies is a fatal disease.  Due to the seriousness of the disease and the possibility of human infection, vaccination is mandatory by Texas State law.  While three year vaccination is available, and allowed by the State, many countries or municipalities mandate animal vaccination due to an elevated risk. 

Canine:  Non-Core Vaccines include:

The Kennel Cough Vaccine: Our kennel cough vaccination protects against Bordetella bronchiseptica, parainfluenza and adenovirus 2 – 3 common upper respiratory bugs that can cause coughing, sneezing, nasal discharge and fever.  These are air-borne viruses and bacteria your pet is exposed to by being around lots of other dogs in puppy class, at the groomer, in a boarding facility, at a dog park or at day care.  We require this vaccine before grooming, boarding or Stay & Play.  Just like the common cold, there are several other culprits that can give your dog a cough.  While the Kennel Cough vaccines is not perfect, it is very effective against the most common offenders.

Leptospirosis Vaccine: This bacterium infects many mammals, both wild and domestic, including dogs and humans. Symptoms may include fever, lethargy, vomiting, abdominal pain, coughing, and urinary problems. Liver and kidney failure are common and it is potentially fatal. The bacterium is shed through the urine of infected animals. Several strains of Leptospirosis exist, but we vaccinate for the 5 most likely to affect your dog.   Please discuss your dog’s risk factors with your veterinarian. 

Lyme Disease:  Canine Lyme disease is a bacterial disease transmitted by the bite of an infected tick harboring the bacterium.  The disease is not passed directly from animal to animal or from dogs to people.   This disease is preventable through vaccination or tick prevention.  If you have lots of ticks in your area or travel frequently with our dog (especially on the East Coast), your dog might be at an increased risk.    

Feline Core Vaccines:

Rhinotracheitis:  Triggered by the common feline herpes virus, symptoms include sneezing, runny nose, corneal ulcers and goopy eye.  Mild forms of the disease may be recurrent.  If left untreated, this disease causes dehydration, starvation and can be fatal.

Calicivirus:  Feline calcivirus, an upper respiratory disease, is shed in discharges from the eyes, nose, mouth, feces, and rarely urine. Symptoms most commonly include oral ulcers, fever, sneezing, ocular and nasal discharge.  Less commonly, we see lethargy, stiffness, joint pain and muscle aches.  FCV has been associated with persistent gingivitis in chronic carriers.

Panleukopenia:  Also known as distemper, this common disease is easily spread from one cat to another.  Symptoms include fever, vomiting and bloody diarrhea.  The disease progresses rapidly, requires immediate medical attention and can be fatal.  It is common in kittens who have not yet been vaccinated. 

Rabies: Rabies virus causes fatal disease in mammals (both wild and domestic) including dogs, cats and humans. The virus enters through a bite wound from a rabid animal, or via exposure of mucous membranes (eyes, nose, mouth) to infected blood or body secretions including saliva. The virus then spreads to the nervous system (causing symptoms like anxiety, aggression, disorientation, incoordination, paralysis, seizures, hyper-salivation, difficulty swallowing) and the salivary glands (enabling transmission to bite victims). There is no cure and rabies is a fatal disease.  Due to the seriousness of the disease and the possibility of human infection, vaccination is mandatory by Texas State law.  While three year vaccination is available, and allowed by the State, many countries or municipalities mandate animal vaccination due to an elevated risk. 

Feline Leukemia (FeLV):  FeLV can be transmitted between infected cats with the transfer of saliva, blood, urine or milk.  All kittens and cats should be tested for FeLV before being vaccinated, when ill or before introducing a new cat into the home.  FeLV manifests in several ways with the most common presentation being what we consider opportunistic infections due to a compromised immune system.  We can also see a variety of cancers including leukemia and lymphoma as a cause of FeLV. 

Please call us today to learn more about vaccinations or to schedule an appointment for your pet.

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BOAT CLUB ROAD ANIMAL HOSPITAL
9635 Boat Club Road | Fort Worth, Texas 76179
Veterinarians near Eagle Mountain Lake, Springtown, Saginaw, River Oaks, Benbrook, White Settlement and Forth Worth area
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